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Cooking With Eggs

Eggs are one of the most nutritious foods on the market today, and quite possibly the world's most perfect protein source. They are also a terrific natural source of many important vitamins and nutrients.

 

It is incredibly easy - and fun - to cook with eggs.

 

How to know your eggs are fresh

The Best Before Date printed on the carton is the best guide for freshness, however this does assume that eggs have been properly refrigerated at every step prior to purchase. If you break an egg into a clean bowl and it has a bad appearance or a bad odour, it is probably best not to eat it.

 

The freshest eggs have a high height to the egg white (albumen). Eggs that are 2 days old are every bit as good to eat as eggs 10 days old, for example, and their nutritional value does not change, however since very fresh eggs perform better in baking than older eggs, here are a few tips. If you break an egg and it spreads all over the pan then it is not the very freshest that it could be because the bonds in the molecules have begun to break down.

 

There is a test that you can do before breaking the egg that is fairly reliable. Most eggs only have a small air cell in the bottom end (not the pointed end), when fresh, so when placed in a full bowl of water they will sink and lie on their side. As eggs age, air enters the porous shell so that old eggs have a larger air cell; the smaller pointed end will stay down in water but the bottom will tilt upward. These eggs are still safe to eat but best used for baking or hard-boiled. Eggs that are going bad will form a little sulphur so the entire egg will float – these eggs should be discarded.

 

Egg equivalents

These approximate equivalents are based on a large (2-oz) egg.

Whole Eggs
3 whole eggs = 1/2 cup
1 whole egg = 3 tablespoons
1/2 whole egg = 4 teaspoons

 

Yolks
6 to 7 egg yolks = 1/2 cup
1 egg yolk = 1 tablespoon

 

Whites
4 to 6 egg whites = 1/2 cup
1 egg white = 2 tablespoons

 

Dried or Powdered Eggs
1 egg = 2 tablespoons egg powder + 2 tablespoons warm water 

 

If you do not have the correct size of egg on hand these approximate equivalents can be used to substitute, however you should be aware that the correct egg size can be important in baking recipes with exacting measurement requirements. 

 

LARGE

JUMBO

X-LARGE

MEDIUM

SMALL

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

2

3

3

2

3

3

4

4

3

4

5

5

5

4

4

6

7

6

5

5

7

8

 

Freezing eggs

Hardboiled egg whites become tough and watery when frozen, however raw eggs can be frozen without concern for toughness. Eggs cannot be frozen in the shell. It is best to thaw eggs in the refrigerator and use them as soon as they are thawed (as with any frozen food).

 

We recommend that you label storage containers with the date and number of eggs.


Whole Eggs: To freeze whole eggs or yolks, crack them into a bowl and gently stir to break up the yolk. They can be kept frozen for up to one year.

Egg Yolks: To prevent yolks from getting lumpy during frozen storage, add a 1/2 teaspoon salt per 1 cup of egg and stir. If you know the eggs will only be used for desserts, add instead 1 tablespoon sugar or corn syrup per 1 cup yolks or whole eggs. Extra egg yolks can be used in recipes like sauces, custards, mayonnaise, scrambled eggs, or cooked puddings.

Egg Whites: Raw egg whites do not suffer from freezing, so it is not necessary to add salt or sugar. Break and separate the eggs one at a time; make sure that no yolk gets into the whites. Pour into ice cube trays and freeze until firm, then transfer to a storage container and label with the date and number of egg whites. Extra egg whites can be used in boiled frostings, meringue cookies, cakes, or meringue for pies.

Hardboiled Egg Yolks: Hardboiled egg yolks can be frozen to use later for toppings or garnishes. Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water to fill at least 1 inch above the yolks. Cover and quickly bring to boil. Immediately remove from heat, cover and let stand in the hot water for 15 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, drain well and place in container for freezing.


We recommend that you freeze eggs in small quantities so you can thaw only what you need. An easy way to do this is to put them in an ice cube tray. Once frozen, you can transfer them to a freezer container.
 

How to make a perfect hardboiled egg

To make perfect hardboiled eggs, use mature eggs. You can determine this by checking the Best Before date and choosing eggs that are close to this – or that have been sitting in your fridge for at least a week. 10-21 days old is ideal for hardboiling (18-7 days before BB date). Why does this make a difference? The answer is pretty easy. Have you ever had a hardboiled egg and found it difficult to break and separate the shell because of a membrane on the inside of the shell? Well, as an egg ages, air very gradually seeps into the shell and this pushes that membrane away from the shell. So once you have that egg with perfect potential in hand, cook it for 10 minutes to hardboil, and just 3 minutes if you prefer your eggs soft boiled.

 

How to peel hardboiled eggs

Place the eggs in a dish and add cold water. Crack the eggs under water to help loosen the membrane under the shell. Start peeling at the larger end, where the air pocket is, and remove the shell under running water. Be sure to get a hold of the membrane under the shell when you remove the shell. The fresher the eggs, the more the shell membranes clings to the shells.
 

 

 

 

Poultry Specialist

A Word from our Poultry Specialist


Ken Severson is the Nutrition and Poultry Specialist for Sparks Egg Farms. Ken takes care to make sure the hens and pullets are fed a balanced diet, and to safeguard their health and welfare.

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Food Safety & Animal Welfare

The 4 Pillars


At Sparks Egg Farms we respect 4 important pillars of responsibility.

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